Caslys COVID-19 Safety Plan

Statement of purpose Caslys is committed to providing a safe and healthy workplace for all staff, as well as others who may enter our premises. Our COVID-19 Safety Plan outlines measures that we are taking to reduce the risk of COVID-19 transmission in our workplace. Development of the safety plan The policies and procedures outlined within the Caslys COVID-19 Safety Plan are based on guidance published by the Provincial Health Officer, the BC Centre for Disease Control and WorkSafeBC. Caslys will modify this plan and any procedures if they are not effective and working as necessary. Questions or concerns regarding compliance with our COVID-19 Safety Plan may be directed to the owners of Caslys via phone or email: Jason Shaw (jshaw@caslys.ca; 250-686-8801) or Luanne Richardson (lrichardson@caslys.ca; 250-884-6481). Protocol for reducing the risk of COVID-19 transmission Before starting work at the Caslys office, all staff must daily complete the BC COVID-19 Self-Assessment Tool (available here: https://bc.thrive.health/covid19/en). 1. First level of protection – elimination Caslys has implemented measures to keep workers at least 2 metres apart, including reducing the number of people at the office. Caslys has continued allowing for work-from-home arrangements, virtual meetings, and limiting the number of people in the workplace. With the measures outlined in this safety plan, all 10 staff members can be at the office at the same time, but to make it a more comfortable work environment, we have revised work schedules so not everyone is in the office at once. 2. Second level of protection – facility readiness Building “flow” Caslys is implementing a new traffic flow to help guide the movement of those entering and exiting the premises. A floor decal has been posted to encourage physical distancing while moving throughout the building. Whenever possible, please enter into the building, move counter-clockwise through the kitchen, […]

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Our response to COVID-19

Caslys is paying close attention to the evolving COVID-19 global situation and following the recommendations posted by federal and provincial health officials. We are committed to adapting our approach as new information becomes available. Working remotely Our team is currently working remotely. Caslys has full access to our online data, email, and GoToMeeting screen sharing services, so we are able to fulfill all of our contractual obligations and project deliverables with no reduction to any of our services. COVID-19 safety plan Our COVID-19 Safety Plan (available here) outlines measures that we are taking to reduce the risk of COVID-19 transmission in our workplace. Contact us If you have any questions or concerns about our work-from-home policy or our COVID-19 Safety Plan, please feel free to contact either of our owners via phone or email: Jason Shaw (jshaw@caslys.ca; 250-686-8801) or Luanne Richardson (lrichardson@caslys.ca; 250-884-6481).   Last updated: 2020-07-29

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Geographers on Vacation: Mapping a Bali Road Trip

When it comes to taking a vacation, not everyone thinks “how can I map this?!” However, as a geographer, mapping is always on my mind and vacations are therefore a great opportunity to bust out my trusty black and yellow handheld GPS unit (affectionately known as Bumblebee) and collect some data. In 2014, I took a trip to Bali, Indonesia with my husband Richard. Not only was it an excellent retreat for the both of us, it was a brilliant opportunity for me to collect some field data that I could play around with later. Fast forward to the summer of 2020, and I – like so many Canadians – am dreaming of a future vacation and reminiscing over past trips. Now is the perfect time to dig into my Bali data and have some fun. Although the COVID-19 pandemic has put all of our travel plans on hold, let’s take a trip down memory lane together (GIS-style) as I share two fun things that you can do with GPS data. Creating an ArcGIS Online elevation app To get around Bali, my husband and I rented a van from a local company. With our accommodations pre-booked all around the island for various dates, we jumped in the van, buckled up, and hit the road to explore the beautiful landscape. We met countless kind, wonderful people, and we learned a lot about the history and culture of Bali as we journeyed from place to place. We visited beaches, mountains, and everything in between. It was a truly unforgettable road trip! To document our travels up and down the mountainous terrain, I created an elevation profile app using my GPS data and ArcGIS Online. The easy-to-use app generated an interactive elevation profile for each leg of our journey (individual legs were each […]

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COVID-19 Isolation and Air Quality in Canada

There was a fair bit of press given to the impact that COVID-19 isolation or lockdown had on air quality in China and northern Italy – two places hard hit by this pandemic and also two places with particularly poor air quality due to industry, transportation and to some extent geography. As our Caslys team began working remotely from home, we wondered how air quality was being impacted here in Canada. So, we leveraged our earth observation skills and tools that we typically use to monitor the Earth’s surface and ventured into the atmosphere. We downloaded data from the Sentinel-5P Troposheric Monitoring Instrument to replicate what we saw in the news overseas. The focus was on nitrogen dioxide (NO2) that comes in large part from the combustion in our cars or the burning of fossil fuels for energy or industry. The Sentinel-5P satellite is able to map a variety of other parameters (listed in the website screen capture above), which may have applications for all sorts of air quality monitoring, but we focused solely on nitrogen dioxide to satisfy our curiosity. To avoid some of the seasonal variation, we plotted the average NO2 concentrations for the period when our local isolation began and the same seasonal range from one year earlier (March 2019 compared to March 2020). We also checked May 2020 to see if the lockdown is still influencing air quality. We looked into a couple of hotspots near Prince Albert, Saskatchewan and found that forest fires were the cause of lower air quality. We plotted the results over the National Geographic basemap service to see the hotspots and the generally improved air quality during isolation. In the images above, the highest concentrations of NO2 in the atmosphere are shown in purple – fading to orange and yellow. The […]

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